Certificate Programs

Advanced Cast Drawing – 7.5 credits

Advanced Cast Drawing – 7.5 credits 2017-08-07T15:03:56+00:00

The student is challenged to see and organize value relationships with more sophistication and strategy.

Advanced Cast Drawing in charcoal reinforces the principles presented in Beginning Cast Drawing and introduces the added challenge of toned paper and white chalk. Students are required to copy two plaster casts.

Advanced Cast Drawing in charcoal reinforces the principles presented in Beginning Cast Drawing and introduces the added challenge of toned paper and white chalk. Students are required to copy two plaster casts. The first cast is a mask or simple head, with the purpose of introducing the student to a more complex approach to value relationships presented by the addition of white chalk and toned ground.  The level of difficulty of the second cast is considered complex.

By starting the drawing on a middle tone and being discouraged from mixing charcoal with white chalk in order to utilize the tone of the paper, the student is challenged to see and organize value relationships with more sophistication and strategy. As the student’s drawing progresses, emphasis is placed on seeing specific half tone shapes and properly compressing them within their value group, in order to achieve a unified and structured drawing.

In order to pass these exercises, the student must correctly draw the subject’s outline, proportion and shadow shape, and display a skillful use of the materials. The instructor also looks for a strong impression of light, accuracy in measurement and values, as well as an achieved sense of form turning in space.

By the conclusion of Advanced Cast Drawing you will be able to:

  • Apply the sight-size method of measurement in order to view and reproduce the subject accurately
  • Demonstrate an ability to compress and organize complex value relationships
  • Create the impression of depth, distance, and atmosphere among parts of the drawing
  • Create a realistic impression of structure and solidity Create a realistic impression of light flowing over form

Advanced Figure Drawing – 8.5 credits

Advanced Figure Drawing – 8.5 credits 2017-08-07T15:05:12+00:00

By decisively organizing and observing value shapes in relationship with anatomical elements, students develop their ability to think as painters.

The figure is the center of the Academy’s curriculum, the core of the program.  Students work under north facing natural light, drawing from live models.  The models return to pose in the same position for the duration of the long pose that may last 4 – 6 weeks, three hours per day. Long-poses are essential to the accomplishment of fully finished drawings.

The figure is the center of the Academy’s curriculum, the core of the program.  Students work under north facing natural light, drawing from live models.  The models return to pose in the same position for the duration of the long pose that may last 4 – 6 weeks, three hours per day. Long-poses are essential to the accomplishment of fully finished drawings.

Advanced Figure Drawing in charcoal reinforces the principles presented in Beginning Figure Drawing and introduces the added challenge of toned paper and white chalk. This progression provides the student with a more complex approach to developing value relationships. Like in cast drawing, by starting the drawing on a middle tone and being discouraged from mixing charcoal with white chalk in order to utilize the tone of the paper, the student is challenged to see and organize value relationships with more sophistication and strategy. As the student’s drawing progresses, emphasis is placed on seeing specific half tone shapes and properly compressing them within their value group, in order to achieve a unified and structured drawing.

By decisively organizing and observing specific value shapes in relationship with structural and anatomical elements, the student further develops their ability to think as painter.

Advanced dawning students are encouraged to produce skeletal and muscular ecroché drawings of their long poses, in order to reinforce their structural understanding of the human figure.

Students attend mandatory life drawing classes in pencil two hours per week, and may choose to attend additional life drawing classes in the evening. Pencil drawing reinforces the importance of learning to reproduce accurately the subject’s outline and shadow line. By placing the model against a neutral background, students are limited to one flat even value in the shadow areas; they are not allowed to put background value into the drawing, nor may they include any middle tone rendering in their drawing, so the outcome is an outline and a flat, even shadow. Pencil drawing allows the student to understand how far he/she can take a drawing, from simple outline to dramatic gesture, while being precise and accurate with regard to proportion, structure and gesture on a small scale.

By the conclusion of Advanced Figure Drawing you will be able to:

  • Apply the sight-size method of measurement in order to view and reproduce the subject accurately
  • Demonstrate an ability to compress and organize complex value relationships
  • Demonstrate an understanding of human anatomy by a sophisticated outline and well designed shadow shapes, as well as descriptive half tone shapes
  • Demonstrate skill in dealing with the subtle changes and movement of the living form and the light
  • Create the impression of form turning in space
  • Create a realistic impression of weight and balance
  • Create a realistic impression of structure and solidity
  • Create a realistic impression of light flowing over form

Beginning Figure Painting – 17.0 credits

Beginning Figure Painting – 17.0 credits 2017-08-07T15:07:48+00:00

A limited palette serves as a manageable base from which to explore expanding degrees of chromatic complexity.

At this level, students concentrate on tonal values, and work in an ordered regimen of grisaille, limited palette and full palette. A successful figure painting uses all of the skills learned in drawing: line, value, gesture and proportion.

At this level, students concentrate on tonal values, and work in an ordered regimen of grisaille, limited palette and full palette. A successful figure painting uses all of the skills learned in drawing: line, value, gesture and proportion. The student begins to paint the figure in grisaille, using black, raw umber and white on toned canvas.  Here the student learns to reproduce the values learned in charcoal drawing in paint.  Since the value-key is again an important consideration, simplifying the number of colors helps the student concentrate on a precise mixture for the values.

Grisaille, or monochromatic painting, is a fundamental step to painting in a naturalistic way. A logical transition from drawing to oil painting, the grisaille simplifies objective figure painting by examining form as value. Not necessarily done in only black and white, the grisaille is an important precursor to working in color. Tonal painting builds on the grisailles, introducing color and temperature in a way that simplifies color relationships and paint handling. With as few as four colors, the surprising range of a limited palette serves as a manageable base from which to explore the ever- expanding degrees of chromatic complexity.

Instructors find that at early stages in the oil painting curriculum, most students have difficulty controlling paint (the student can see the value but cannot mix it, or apply it successfully). Students are introduced to painting techniques, the properties of individual pigments, oils and varnishes, and the use of grounds and mediums. They attend technical demonstrations on paint grinding and canvas preparation. They learn to grind their own paint, and begin without the aid of mediums, concentrating on exact mixtures and values.

Extended poses give the student ample time to study the nuances of light and shadow, and experiment with paint application.

By the conclusion of Beginning Figure Painting you will be able to:

  • Successfully apply drawing skills to the painting medium technique
  • Demonstrate a control and organization of the materials (oil and canvas)
  • Achieve a sense of reality using values and temperature shifts when working in grisaille and limited palette
  • Produce accurate color-values, sense of light, atmosphere and space

Beginning Painting – 15.0 credits

Beginning Painting – 15.0 credits 2017-08-07T15:13:18+00:00

Students attend technical demonstrations and learn to grind their own paint, beginning without the aid of mediums, concentrating on exact mixtures and values.

At this level, students concentrate on tonal values, and work in an ordered regimen of grisaille, limited palette and full palette.

At this level, students concentrate on tonal values, and work in an ordered regimen of grisaille, limited palette and full palette.

The student begins to paint the plaster cast in grisaille, using black, raw umber and white on toned canvas.  Here the student learns to reproduce the values learned in charcoal drawing in paint.  Since the value-key is again an important consideration, simplifying the number of colors helps the student concentrate on a precise mixture for the values.

Grisaille, or monochromatic painting, is a fundamental step to painting in a naturalistic way. A logical transition from drawing to oil painting, the grisaille simplifies objective figure painting by examining form as value. Not necessarily done in only black and white, the grisaille is an important precursor to working in color. Tonal painting builds on the grisailles, introducing color and temperature in a way that simplifies color relationships and paint handling. With as few as four colors, the surprising range of a limited palette serves as a manageable base from which to explore the ever-expanding degrees of chromatic complexity.

Instructors find that at early stages in the oil painting curriculum, most students have difficulty controlling paint (he can see the value but cannot mix it, or apply it successfully). Students are introduced to painting techniques, the properties of individual pigments, oils and varnishes, and the use of grounds and mediums. They attend technical demonstrations on paint grinding and canvas preparation. They learn to grind their own paint, and begin without the aid of mediums, concentrating on exact mixtures and values.

By the conclusion of Beginning Painting you will be able to:

  • successfully apply drawing skills to the painting medium technique
  • correctly transpose the subject’s outline, proportion and shadow shape
  • use skillfully his materials (oil and canvas)
  • achieve a sense of reality using values and temperature when working in limited and full palette
  • produce accurate color-values, drawing, sense of light, atmosphere and space (Fruit Project)