Certificate Programs

Anatomy, the Living Form · 3.0 credits

Anatomy, the Living Form · 3.0 credits 2017-08-07T15:33:23+00:00

Weekly lectures begin with a discussion of the skeleton and myology, the study of the muscles, then move to drawing exercises with the model.

“The Living Form” is a phrase taken from the 19th century anatomist, Dr. Paul Richer, in his classic text, “Artistic Anatomy”. It describes our goal as draftsmen, painters, and sculptors who study anatomy in order to see the shape and structure of the human form as it exists in life.

“The Living Form” is a phrase taken from the 19th century anatomist, Dr. Paul Richer, in his classic text, “Artistic Anatomy”. It describes our goal as draftsmen, painters, and sculptors who study anatomy in order to see the shape and structure of the human form as it exists in life, as opposed to the altered and fragmented forms of the cadaver, or the static nature of charts and diagrams. Richer believed that the key to understanding form is to draw from life regularly, and to complement this visual method of study with a solid intellectual understanding of the structures of the human body. With its strong emphasis on drawing from life in both the painting and sculpture programs, students at The Florence Academy of Art study anatomy daily. It is the goal of the Anatomy course to complement these studies and offer students new tools to help them understand the connections between exterior forms and deeper structures.

Weekly lectures begin with a discussion of the skeleton and myology, the study of muscles, then move on to drawing exercises with the model. Throughout the course a strong emphasis will be placed on morphology, the study of the forms. Students will be encouraged to study from various sources that include selected texts, life casts, 3 dimensional models, the works of master painters and sculptors, live models, and local resources in Florence such as the 18th century human anatomy wax collection at “La Specola” Museum of Natural History. The course will also include brief discussions of relevant historical figures and events that have contributed to the science of anatomy. Thus we place this discipline into the context of the history and tradition of Western figurative art. The drawing portion of the class is designed to help students commit the forms of the human body to memory. Extra work outside of the class is not required but encouraged. Those who attend regularly and participate in class exercises will be given priority for admission to the Ecorchè Sculpture course.

By the conclusion of Anatomy, The Living Form you will be able to work freely and confidently with the human figure and use the descriptive information it provides to create a believable visual impression.