Certificate Programs

Sculpture Drawing Program – 76.5 credits

Sculpture Drawing Program – 76.5 credits 2017-08-07T15:32:10+00:00

When students are able to achieve an accurate rendering in 2 dimensions they can apply this knowledge to the more complex task of making sculpture.

Drawing is considered a fundamental skill for sculptors; when students are able to achieve an accurate rendering in 2 dimensions they can apply this knowledge to the more complex task of observing and rendering a sculpture with its multiple viewpoints.

Drawing is considered a fundamental skill for sculptors; when students are able to achieve an accurate rendering in 2 dimensions they can apply this knowledge to the more complex task of observing and rendering a sculpture with its multiple viewpoints. Therefore, the Sculpture Program is broken down into lessons in sculpture and lessons in drawing (although third year students may opt not to continue the drawing during their final trimester.)

Students will spend three hours five days a week drawing the figure in charcoal. They will also have two hours one evening a week when they will draw the figure in pencil. Students will often draw on a light background to concentrate on line and emphasize the total silhouette. Precision of this outline is crucial for accuracy, as comprehending the figure’s geometry by locating and connecting the bony points will help the sculptor find and explain specific forms in clay. By also drawing with a dark background, students learn to identify changes in form or planes.

Students enrolled in Sculpture who perform exceptionally well in drawing may be selected by the instructors to draw in the model rooms of the Intensive Drawing or Painting programs, space permitting, to push the level of their drawing even higher.

Course Objectives

To introduce the student to the most important elements when drawing the figure: proportion, body type and gesture.

During the first trimester students do not need to finish a drawing but have the beginning stages well understood and solidly drawn. Proportion, body type and gesture must match what has been observed in nature on the model.

During the course of the year, students solidify the understanding of line drawing and introducing mass drawing as a tool in order to be more accurate. Proportion, body type and gesture have to be solid. Shapes have to be specific. A value key has to be introduced and the principle of how to work with values has to be understood.

By the final trimester students practice accuracy in line and mass drawing, key the values to the lightest and darkest value seen in nature, and work out the values in between in relationship to each other referring back to the value key.

Advanced students may take the drawing one step further and experiment with values, keying the background and shadow value referring to the value key, and if the quality of the drawing allows it, start working on halftones, moving from the dark halftones into the lighter ones.

Upon completion of Sculpture Drawing the student should be able to:

  • Indicate important internal information with few lines
  • Demonstrate understanding of proportions, body type and gesture
  • Demonstrate understanding of anatomy
  • Relate and connect body parts to each other in a rational way
  • Maintain symmetry even if foreshortening is present
  • Reach an accurate outline and shadow line in an earlier stage of drawing
  • Introduce a flat grey value, turning the drawing from a pure linear approach into a mass drawing
  • Perceive the drawing through shapes; light shapes and shadow shapes and corrections must be made
  • Refine shapes until they are specific, not generalized
  • Refine values to explain form
  • Refine edges to describe form